City Guide to Edinburgh, Scotland

City Guide to Edinburgh, Scotland

Broke Britannia! Review


By Gordon Clayton - Posted on 24 August 2010

Scene from Broke Britannia ! by David Shireff & Russell Sarre
4
Show details
Company: 
OSO Productions
Running time: 
70mins
Production: 
Ross Livingstone (director), Jon Hooper (musical director)
Performers: 
Libby Gore (Davinia)m Dylan Esbach (Wolf), Charlie Dupre (Enzo), Anna Neill (Genie), George Shireff ( Alastair Darling), Marcus Massey( Andy Hornby), Oliver Walters (Lord Adair), Matt McMaster (Mervyn King)

Broke Britannia! is still topical and is an interesting hotchpotch of characters - some from a relevant childhood story and some depicting well known names still affecting daily lives.

Those in the audience that followed the near collapse of banks and financial markets in some detail probably got the most from the very clever lyrics and I noticed one particular gentleman who just delighted in the irony and presumably accuracy of the the writer David Shireff's words. The observations of the financial scene by an impressionable Jack the lad (Enzo) from East London and his less-than-impressed girlfriend Davina are also very apt.

The show opens with a financial wolf or financial adviser and develops as the young couple eavesdrop on self-delusional traders and the three unwise men, the Financial Services Regulator, the Chancellor and the Governor of the Bank of England. As the story of the collapse unfolds, the young couple get on to the financial ladder with varying success.

While occasionally the male group singing seems slightly off, the routines and the diction did not disappoint. All of the cast have a good presence and the Mervyn King has an uncanny likeness to the real life person (albeit a little younger) - Enro reminded me of Gary Wilmot as the cockney character from ‘Me and My Girl’.

Davina, who transforms into a financially worldly wise Little Red Riding Hood, is superb not only for her performance while in the spotlight but holding her expressions when observing the other characters acting out their songs and routines.

Russell Sarre's music is generally good and catchy and the band adds to the overall enjoyment of the show. Although satire is sometimes the only weapon in the hands of the commentators, the audience at least can have a laugh while thinking that these characters will do it all over again, not only till Saturday but when the house of cards falls again.

Show Times
Til 28 August, 8.10pm

Ticket Prices
£10 ( £7)