City Guide to Edinburgh, Scotland

City Guide to Edinburgh, Scotland

Council Recruits 30 More Street Cleaners For Summer Litter


By edg - Posted on 17 July 2014

Cigarette butts in Princes Street Gardens

Whether it's overflowing bins, seagull-chewed rubbish bags whose contents have been strewn across the pavement, fast-food packaging, or paper fliers drifting in the wind, there is no end of litter to deal with in Edinburgh during Summer time.

To combat the problem, Edinburgh City Council have recruited an additional 30 uniformed street cleaners. They form part of a 75-strong team, who with their barrows and litter-picking equipment, will be cleaning up after the crowds move on.

“Summer is a fantastic time for Edinburgh and I look forward to welcoming the thousands of people who are set to enjoy the capital," said Environment Convener, Councillor Lesley Hinds.

“However, there is no doubt the influx of tourists and other members of public making the most of the city have an impact on our surroundings."

“That’s why it’s essential that we focus resources on keeping the streets clean and tidy for both residents and visitors, and I’m sure our new cleaning force will do a great job.”

Dedicated staff will cover areas like Princes Street Gardens, Calton Hill and Regent Road Park, while additional street cleaners will be deployed to parts of the south of the city, including the Pleasance, Tollcross and the Meadows.

They will also work with the Fringe Society to target problem spots on the High Street, as well as liaising with businesses to resolve the problem of overflowing trade waste bins.

In addition to an increase in street cleaners, the Council will be adding extra litter bins around the city to cope with the anticipated rise in rubbish. Among these will be a batch of extra large bins, to be located in areas like George Street, Waterloo Place and the foot of Calton Hill, plus a further 25 super-sized bins for placement in popular locations such as Portobello Promenade and the Meadows.

Armed with litter pickers and bin bags they will patrol the city centre and other popular locations throughout July and August.

However, there is only so much the litter picker force can catch. For example, yesterday, in East Edinburgh's Princes Street Gardens it was near impossible to find a square metre of grass without cigarette ends. The public park has dedicated cigarette end disposal bins, but they are clearly underused by many smokers.

“We want to provide a welcoming and attractive atmosphere for everyone visiting and living in Edinburgh," says Hinds.

“But we have to count on the public to do their bit too – we can’t make the capital beautiful without their help. Show some love for Edinburgh by making sure you dispose of litter responsibly all year round.”

You can report litter and overflowing bins on the Council website.