Edinburgh Film Festival

The other stand-out piece for me at this year’s festival was the grim post-apocalyptic movie by French director Xavier Gens, The Divide.

For all its flaws, the Edinburgh Film Festival, which ends tomorrow, has presented a fine selection of documentaries from around the globe, possibly fostered by new connections with Sheffield’s much acclaimed documentary festival. They’ve ranged from inspired and thought-provoking all the way down to practically unwatchable.

The Edinburgh International Film Festival is saving a few watts of energy at a series of bicycle powered film screenings this week. I say "bike powered" but you could as easily say it's "whisky powered" as the event - in a rare combination of a form of transport and alcohol - is being sponsored by Cutty Sark Blended Scotch Whisky.

I've just come out of a screening of 'My Brothers', thought it was a lovely little movie from first time writer Will Collins and first time director Paul Fraser.

On Day three I decided to catch up with the actual films of the festival and try to leave the critical theory behind me for a day.

My second day was almost entirely consumed by the day-long symposium that was Project: New Cinephilia. This seminar-esque attempt to create meaningf

It’s underway then, and as we speak glasses of wine are being poured and the viewing public is preparing to decide what it thinks of opening night film,

A new film by the Hungarian master of cinema, Bela Tarr, is always to be welcomed, particularly when it represents his final artistic statement, as “Turin Horse” is seemingly set to be.

It’s almost upon us. The badges are being handed out, the delegate booklet is in my possession and the premiere is all set for Wednesday night. What should we be getting excited about then?