Edinburgh International Science Festival

EISF content

Saturday morning's EIF chamber concert at the Queen’s Hall featured players from the Nash Ensemble – Alasdair Beatson (piano); Adrian Brendel (cell

When looking for signs of global warming, the melting of the world’s glaciers and ice sheets is often cited as the one of most glaring indicators.

Theoretical physicist and broadcaster Prof Jim Al-Khalili is in conversation about his debut novel, Sunfall, with novelist Lin Anderson.

Christiana Figueres last night received the prestigious Edinburgh Medal at the Signet Library in Edinburgh with a rousing speech that urged “stubborn optimism” in th

In the sphere of climate change, 19th century Irish physicist John Tyndall (1820-1893) is a giant.

Glaciers lock up 10% of the world's freshwater. These great bodies of ice play an important part in the Earth's development, carving landscapes, influencing climate and affecting global sea level.

We all rely on the seas for their abundant food, mineral and energy resources and yet more than 90% of the deep oceans remain totally unexplored.

One of the events around climate change at the Edinburgh Science Festival (6-21 April) takes as its starting point the rallying cry "12 Years to Save the Planet".

Malthus was right. There is not enough planet to sustain the growing human population, particularly given our species' profligate use of land and resources.

The oceans offer the potential for huge amounts of clean energy and Scotland and the UK are poised to be a world leader in the field.