City Guide to Edinburgh, Scotland

City Guide to Edinburgh, Scotland

Politics


Hora, EIF 2012, Review

Batsheva Dance Company ensemble

The performance of ‘Hora’ by Israeli dance company, Batsheva, was completely overshadowed by the human rights protesters who, rightly or wrongly, took centre stage this evening.

John McCarthy: Captivity, Fame and Surviving Freedom, EIBF 2012, Review

John McCarthy was introduced by Allan Little for this inaugural Frederick Hood Memorial Lecture.  It was also the concluding event of a most successful Edinburgh International Book Festival.

Saul David - Soldiering On, EIBF 2012, Review

Saul David seems to have undergone an alarming make-over since the earlier days of his writing career.

Both My Fathers Were Spies, EIBF 2012, Review

Professor Paul Broda was introduced by Tam Dalyell who said that it must be unique to have two fathers who both passed secrets to the Soviet Union in 1942 for no personal gain.    Hi

Jeremy Vine: This is the Old News, EIBF 2012, Review

Peter Gutteridge took the stage alone to introduce Jeremy Vine who then bounded on to the platform from the shadows.

Even the Rain - Charity Film Screening

A special one-off charity screening of Even the Rain (Tambien la Lluvia), a 2010 Spanish drama film starring Gael Garcia Bernal and Luis Tosar at SYHA Edinburgh Central, with a guest appearance by

Alistair Darling: Bringing Britain Back from the Brink, EIBF 2012, Review

James Naughtie introduced Alistair Darling for this Thomas Miller Investment Event which was held fittingly in the RBS Main Theatre.

Re-Thinking The Union (Part 2): Would an Independent Scotland Lose its International Influence? EIBF 2012 Review

This was the second debate in the Edinburgh International Book Festival’s trilogy of events under the title ‘Re-thinking the Union’ (here is

The Falklands War: Truth and Lies, EIBF 2012, Review

Tam Dalyell, Paul Rogers and Ruth Wishart came into the RBS Main Theatre well before the start of the session with Tam looking a little frail and walking with a stick.   When Ruth Wishart